You are now leaving HepC.com

You are connecting to a site that is not under the control of AbbVie. AbbVie is not responsible for the contents of any such site or any further links from such site. AbbVie is providing these links to you only as a convenience and the inclusion of any link does not imply the endorsement of the linked site by AbbVie. You should also be aware that the linked site may be governed by its own set of terms and conditions and privacy policy for which AbbVie has no responsibility.

 

You are leaving the HepC.com Patient Site

You are about to enter a site that is for US Healthcare Professionals only. By selecting “Yes” below, you certify that you are a Healthcare Professional and that you wish to proceed to the Healthcare Professionals Only section of this site.

I am a licensed Healthcare Professional and wish to proceed to the Healthcare Professionals Only section of the site.

 

You haven’t completed personalizing your action plan!

Would you like to print anyway?

 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

AbbVie is providing this service to help patients find doctors in their area.

No fees have been received by or paid to doctors for participating in this locator service. Inclusion of any physician in this directory does not represent an endorsement by or recommendation from AbbVie.

You are ultimately responsible for the selection of a physician and it is an important decision that you should consider carefully. This doctor locator tool is just one source of information available to you.

OK

 

Your personalized action plan has been sent to your email address!

GO

 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

AbbVie is providing this service to help patients find doctors in their area.

No fees have been received by or paid to doctors for participating in this locator service. Inclusion of any physician in this directory does not represent an endorsement by or recommendation from AbbVie.

You are ultimately responsible for the selection of a physician and it is an important decision that you should consider carefully. This doctor locator tool is just one source of information available to you.

OK

 

Why wasn’t this helpful?




 

You are now leaving HepC.com

By clicking Continue below, you’ll be leaving HepC.com and going to a site informing you about a prescription treatment option.

Sponsored by AbbVie

Find Us On:   Share

Treating Hep C

If you have been diagnosed with hepatitis C, a primary care doctor or specialist will run tests to see if hep C has damaged your liver. Medicines called antivirals can help you cure the virus. Together, you and your doctor can decide if you should start a prescription drug combination.

Hep C is a serious disease, but it can be cured — the primary goal of treatment. “Cure” means the hep C virus is not detectable in your blood on a test performed by your doctor months after treatment has ended. This is also known as sustained virologic response. In 15% to 25% of cases, the body clears hep C by itself. This usually happens within 6 months of getting the virus. However, most people need medical treatment to help clear the virus.

All people with chronic hep C need treatment to cure it. Even after you are cured, your doctor will still need to monitor your liver health, as liver damage isn’t always reversible. Also, you need to discuss ways you can prevent reinfection with hep C.

Treatment Options for Hep C

Most people infected with hep C don't get rid of the virus without treatment. Left untreated, the virus continues to make copies of itself inside the liver. Over time, this can cause scarring of the liver.

CURRENT TREATMENTS

Treatments for hep C include combinations of medicines that work by helping the immune system clear the virus and keeping it from multiplying.

In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the first time direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the treatment of hep C. DAAs, including protease inhibitors, block enzymes that the hep C virus uses to multiply. More options have been approved since then.

Your doctor might also suggest “watchful waiting.” This option doesn’t mean you’re not doing anything. It just means that you and your doctor will continue to monitor your health to stay on top of your condition. Whether your doctor starts you on treatment right away or safely delays, it’s important to schedule regular checkups.

READY TO SEE WHAT’S AVAILABLE?
LEARN MORE ABOUT A TREATMENT
OPTION FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS C  


Back to Top


Hep C Treatment History

HISTORY OF HEP C

It’s been estimated that the hep C virus has been around for over a hundred years. However, it wasn’t until 1989 that scientists identified the virus. Highly accurate routine testing of donated blood for hep C began in the United States in 1992. This greatly lowered the risk of getting the virus through blood transfusions or organ transplants. The first treatments for hep C were approved in the 1990s. Hep C has continued to be an active area of research. This has resulted in the introduction of DAAs.

IS A CURE FOR HEP C POSSIBLE?

The medical term for a hep C cure is “sustained virologic response.” If your doctor says you’re cured, it means the hep C virus is not detectable in your blood on a test performed by your doctor months after treatment has ended. Relapse or reinfection is still possible, so stay in regular contact with your doctor so that he or she can tell you if your treatment was successful. It’s important to keep getting regular checkups, as you can still have liver disease even after you have been cured.


Back to Top